12 Amazing Shipping Container Buildings!

12 Amazing Shipping Container Buildings!

Its fascinating to see hundreds of developments using recycled shipping containers to create something new and innovative. From fantastic container homes, luxury pools and even nurseries, there seems to be no limit! Here we’ve selected a handful of our favourite shipping container buildings from around the world…


Caution Cinema – Scott Whitby

Scott Whitby studio has used over 1,000 foam pyramids inside a shipping container to turn it into a mobile Caution Cinema. The installation was designed to help Britain’s port workers stay engaged by continuing to learn behaviour practices that could one day save their lives.

“As well as blocking out all external light and sound for the cinema, the disorientating, winding route encourages visitors to become acutely aware of their surroundings.” Whitby explained. “Visitors are forced to take extra care and to proceed with caution – as promoted by the safety campaign. It is hoped that the memory of this multi-sensory experience and intervention will be embedded in the user’s memory for a long time to come.” To see this article in full follow the link below.

Scott Whitby: Caution Cinema

Vietnam Hostel – TAK Architects

Vietnam is fast becoming the new Thailand. As hundreds of tourists, backpackers and twenty-something’s pass through the country the hostel industry is booming. Enter TAK Architects, who created a beautiful, brightly coloured haven in Nha Trang. With aerial bridges connecting the shipping containers and huge communal hammock areas there’s no wonder the Ccasa Hostel is getting a lot of attention. The design is based on that of a home, with stacked bedrooms and large socialising areas. Click on the link below to have a closer look at this stunning industrial home from home.

Vietnam Hostel

Lookout Tower Tasmanian Vineyard – Cumulus

A lookout post over a vineyard in Tasmanian sounds idyllic. What makes this even better is that it’s been built by Cumulus studios, using recycled shipping containers. Cumulus designed this spaced, named ‘Devils Corner Lookout’ for the Brown Brothers winery. There are two structures and they provide a semi-sheltered space for wine and food tasting, while gazing out over the vast landscape. Check out this spectacular piece of architecture through the link here.

Lookout Tower

Housing for veterans

Housing for homeless veterans

This is one heart-warming story made even better because it’s using recycled shipping containers! American Family Housing are the organisation responsible for the development, providing studio sized homes for military Veterans, many of whom had been living on the streets. The potter’s lane housing complex offers the Veterans a safe place to live. The project is America’s first permanent housing for the homeless and we couldn’t be happier it was built with shipping containers! To see the full story follow our link.

Container Skyscraper

This concept for shipping container skyscrapers is the definition of innovative. CRG Architects have proposed a plan to replace slum housing with 2 giant skyscrapers, built of over 2,500 containers and should be able to house up to 5,000 people! Not only this but the towers will feature a colour scheme that is intended to represent the hottest and coldest parts of the building – based on the compass points to show the transition of temperature. For the full info on this project follow the link.

Shipping container skyscrapers

Floating student housing

Floating student housing

Bjarke Ingels’ firm, BIG has created low-cost housing for students in the centre of Copenhagen. We wouldn’t exactly say they are the normal student digs, with BIG using nine shipping containers stacked on a floating platform in Copenhagen Harbour. Urban Rigger, consists of 15 studio apartments over 2 levels, where the ends of each container overlapping to help protect the housing from possible rising sea levels. It also frames a shared garden area in the middle. Want to read more? Just follow the link to our very own featured article!

Discover more amazing shipping container buildings below!

Container City

This is two pieces of shipping container architecture in east London. It is principally a means of utilizing standard forty-foot equivalent unit shipping containers, at the end of their life, to produce flexible accommodation and offices at low cost.

Office containers

Hechingen Studio is a crystal-shaped shipping container office that uses multiple glazed end walls to funnel natural light into the interior. The floor-to-ceiling glass also frames views of the surrounding landscape.

Fawood Children’s Center

This incredible building is made from recycled containers and has been transformed into a child’s dream!

Container Globe Theatre

Angus Vail, a rock music business manager from New Zealand, wants to build a Shakespearean Globe Theatre in Detroit. But rather than a heavy timber and plaster structure, like the 16th century version, his vision is to build using shipping containers!

Shipping Container Art School

LOT-EK, has just won the New York AIA Chapter Honors Award for their APAP OpenSchool in Korea. The school which was inaugurated in the summer of 2010 is an art school featuring an open-air covered amphitheater, studios and exhibition space.

Container House

David Wade says building a shipping container house requires living outside the box as well as thinking outside the box! He started the project in November after he was inspired by a similar house in Maine, designed by architect Adam Kalkin.

Dusk to Dawn – Breakbulk Competition

Dusk to Dawn – Breakbulk Competition

Breakbulk’s first photo and video contest for 2017 is all about transport projects that take place from dusk until the early hours of dawn.

 

As we all know twilight is rarely the ideal time to move project cargo but sometimes it is necessary due to highway regulations or timing requirements. Breakbulk have launched a competition asking global break bulk specialists to send in their low light travels on the water, at a port, a landing field or on dry land.

All photo and video entries will be displayed at Breakbulk China 2017, 13-16 March at the Shanghai World Expo Exhibition & Convention Center (SWEECC) in Shanghai, China. The photo winner will be featured in Issue 1 of Breakbulk Magazine 2017.

Tuscor Lloyds will be exhibiting at Breakbulk Europe this year. We’re looking forward to another fantastic show! After our success at last years exhibition, we are designing a homey-feel this year, centering our stand around people, just like our business.

Tuscor Lloyds Sunrise in Malta

For this competition, we have selected an image taken by our very own Neel Ratti. Neel captured the shot while on location in Malta, as he enjoyed the sun rising over the port one morning. Neel travelled to Malta to oversee the smooth relocation of offshore oil and gas equipment, making its way from Malta to Aberdeen.

Thanks to his experience in the industry and amazing connections we have made over the years, the whole job only took 15 days from start to finish. See below the breath taking image he captured for us!

Impressed? VOTE for our entry in the Breakbulk competition here!

Call: +44 (0) 161 868 6000 | Email: projects@tuscorlloyds.com

Nautical Language in 21st Century

Nautical Language in 21st Century

Nautical language has influenced our modern day vocabulary more than we know. It is fascinating to discover just how many nautical words and phrases have been adopted over the centuries. 

Humanities close relationship with the sea has had a major influence on the words and expressions we use today.

The Western world has its roots in the areas surrounding the Mediterranean Sea. From as far back as the first Phoenician and Greek cultures (over 2,000 years ago) the Sea has not only been essential for basic survival, but in maintaining economic and social ties for the surrounding communities.

Many familiar words and phrases unexpectedly originate from this relationship with the sea; from commonly used words like ‘overwhelm’ – meaning to capsize and casual’ that was used to describe the wages paid to seamen between their regular payments.

The English language also gained many terms during the 18th and 19th centuries when British naval and merchant ships travelled the seas.

Expressions such as ‘square meal’ which refers to the tray food consumed on early British warships. Phrases like please stand by’ is an expression derived from the command given to sailors when they need to be ready.

Over the centuries new words and phrases have entered into our language from this continuous tie to our planets oceans. See just some of our examples below!

Nautical Language

If you are interested in learning more historical terms coined through humanities relationship with the sea follow the link below.

Old School Terms
Port and Starboard

Port is the nautical term for left and starboard means right. Originally the words come from the old sailing ships that did not have a rudder and were steered using a board on the right side which became known as the “steerboard” side, the other side of the vessel was called the port side as the boat was docked on this side so as to not interfere with the steering board.

Albatross Around One’s Neck

An Albatross is a large and long-winged seabird of the Southern Hemisphere capable of long flights. It was believed among seamen that albatrosses embodied the souls of dead sailors and it was considered unlucky to kill one.

Bamboozle

From the 17th century, it described the Spanish custom of hoisting false flags to deceive (bamboozle) enemies. Today if one intentionally deceives someone, they are said to have bamboozled them.

Combing the Cat

When flogging a seaman, “combing the cat” meant to run fingers through the cat-o’-nine-tails after each stroke to separate the strands in preparation for the next stroke.

Whole Nine Yards

This expression means everything or all encompassing. The expression comes from the old square-rigged sailing vessels that had three masts with three yards of sails on each.  The whole nine yards meant all sails were up.

 

21st Century
Shipper / Consignor: 

An individual or firm that sends freight. A freight originator.

Hub-and-Spoke: 

A transportation system design in which large hub terminals are used for freight consolidation. Medium-volume services serve the spoke-to-hub collection and hub-to-spoke distribution tasks. Large-volume services are operated in the hub-top-hub markets. In most systems, all outbound/inbound freight for a spoke uses the same hub, and thus larger shipment sizes are realised. Many transportation systems oriented in this way.

Dead-head

A portion of a transportation trip in which no freight is conveyed; an empty move. Transportation equipment is often dead-headed because of imbalances in supply and demand. For example, many more containers are shipped from Asia to North America than in reverse; empty containers are therefore dead-headed back to Asia.

Tramp Shipping: 

An ocean carrier company operating vessels not on regular runs or schedules. They call at any port where cargo may be available. Sometimes used for bulk cargo shipping.

Breakbulk Cargo: 

Cargo in-between bulk and containerised, that must be handled piece-by-piece by terminal workers (stevedores). Often stored in bags or boxes and stacked onto pallets. Smaller lift equipment (forklifts, small cranes) used than for containerised cargo, but more labour intensive.

 

Logistics Glossary

If you are interested in reading more about the language of logistics follow this link.

Author Info

Rachel Finch

Rachel Finch

Design and Marketing Assistant

Rachel is a new addition to the family, she’s already been making waves on our social media platforms and learning more everyday about the complexities of our industry. Yoga obsessed – she should be flexible enough to do the job!

5 Heavy Transport Projects Standing on Our Heads

5 Heavy Transport Projects Standing on Our Heads

At Tuscor Lloyds we know heavy transport projects are not for the faint of heart. Together with our network of heavy haulage specialists we have completed some impressive projects around the globe. To celebrate our new campaign we’re talking you through some of the biggest, heaviest pieces we have ever shipped, standing on our heads…


UK to Mexico – 125 tonnes

Cargo: Turbo Generator Parts
Cargo Weight: 2 pieces at 62.5 tonnes each = 125 tonnes
Cargo Origin: UK
Cargo Destination: Mexico
Special Requirements: Heavy duty swivel hook crane (70t capacity), Mafi Trailers, Flat rack Containers

This consignment totalled 125 tonnes. That’s the equivalent of 10 double Decker busses but to Tuscor Lloyds it’s child’s play. The wooden cases contained turbo-generator parts, with both items shipped as separate breakbulk and out of gauge consignments. The weight of the cargoes (62.5 tons each) required them to be loaded onto mafi trailers (from the low loaders) using ship/shore cranes. Just some of the specialist equipment required in heavy transport logistics.

Turbo Generator Heavy Transport
Heavy Transport Cable Reel to Canada

UK to Canada – 230 tonnes

Cargo Origin: Liverpool, UK
Cargo Destination: Halifax, Canada
Industry: Oil & Gas
Service: RORO
Cargo: Steel Wire Reel

This 230 ton consignment for one of our regular clients in the oil and gas industry consisted of 5 cable reels collected from Liverpool, UK and delivered to Halifax, Canada. With dimensions of 3 x 2.6 x 3.1 meters and a weight of 46 tons each it was no small feat securing the cargo for smooth sailing.

China to UK – 260 Tonnes

Cargo description: Biomass Boiler
Cargo Weight: 260 tonnes in total
Cargo origin: Changsha, Hunan Province China
Cargo Destination: UK
Special Requirements: Floating crane, Flat rack containers, OOG Permits, split shipment, river barge.

Having worked on similar jobs from mainland China, Tuscor Lloyds were quickly recommended for the project, which was to be the first of many throughout the summer. The boiler and components were consolidated into 46 pieces weighing 260 tonnes in total (the equivalent of 130 average sized cars or 52 African elephants.) The pieces consisted of one 83 ton Breakbulk item at 15 metres in length as well as 7 x flat rack containers holding the remaining Out of Gauge Cargo.

Heavy Transport Port of Felixstowe
Heavy transport Flat rack Container

Germany to Mexico – 368 Tons

Cargo description: Flexographic printing machine.
Cargo Weight: 368 tons
Cargo origin: Bielefeld, Germany
Cargo Destination: Veracruz, Mexico
Special Requirements: Flat rack containers, police escort, heavy lift crane.

Tuscor Lloyds were called in to organise this large consignment from the UK to Veracruz, Mexico. The project consisted of involved transporting 27 standard shipping containers and 10 flat rack containers loaded with out of gauge and break bulk cargo to Veracruz, Mexico.

Aqaba to Felixstowe – 475 Tonnes

Cargo: Trucks, Land rovers, Generators, Fuel Truck, Support Equipment
Cargo Weight: 475 tonnes approx.
Cargo Origin: Aqaba, Jordan
Cargo Destination: Feslixstowe, UK
Special Requirements: Hazardous Cargo, Escort required in Jordan due to Military cargoes.

Tuscor Lloyds projects team moved a total of 475 tonnes of support equipment from Aqaba, Jordan to Felixstowe, England. The cargo included a variety of trucks, generators and land rovers, as well as some of the shippers own containers. In notoriously difficult terrain the teams experience was called upon to ensure smooth transit on land and great coordination for the transhipment arrangements.

Shipping Aqaba to Felixstowe

At Tuscor Lloyds we have the knowledge to piece together any shipment.

Request a free quote today and discover how we can strengthen your supply chain.

Breakbulk Crazy Cargo Photo Competition

Breakbulk Crazy Cargo Photo Competition

Our projects team have moved some weird and wonderful cargo over the years, so the latest Breakbulk photo contest ‘Crazy Cargo’ was not to be missed.

The competition required the most unusual and/or exceptionally large and heavy pieces of cargo transported from around the world. It was a difficult decision shortlisting just one entry, so we’ll share with you Tuscor Lloyds Crazy Cargo Countdown…

3. Art of Shipping – Rise through Education Sculpture 

We took creative shipping to a literal meaning when asked to move an original sculpture created by contemporary Italian artist Lorenzo Quinn, entitled ‘Rise through Education’. This journey saw Tuscor Lloyds transport the piece from Barcelona to its new home in Nhava Sheva, India.

The Art of Shipping – Rise through Education Sculpture

2. Time flies in Tuscor Lloyds projects!

It’s not every day you are asked to assist with shipping a helicopter. Our Mexico-based client operates an exclusive air chartering company in North America, with a fleet of private jets and helicopters designed for high-profile clientele. Tuscor Lloyds assembled a team of specialised packers, engineers and equipment to meet the aircraft in order to prepare it for transport.

Shipping Helicopter to Mexico

1 Tuscor Lloyds Horsing around – Our Breakbulk Contest Entry!

Our team are not often accused of horsing around, but this shipment from Felixstowe to Philadelphia really set the bar for crazy cargo. The unusual shipment was made all the more pressurised with the delivery being time sensitive as the sculpture was required at an event in the USA.

This unusual out of gauge project cargo had dimensions of 10.3 x 3.4 x 3.2 meters and weighed 7 tons. The shipment was picked up in Felixstowe; where the sculpture was built and transported by road to the port of Felixstowe where it would be shipped to the USA.

The sculpture was required at an event being held close to the port of Philadelphia, and once unloaded the cargo was stripped from the 40ft flat rack, and loaded onto another low load trailer for the movement to the event.

Tuscor Lloyds Horsing around Breakbulk

Impressed? VOTE for our entry in the Breakbulk competition here!

If you feel you have some crazy cargo and not sure where to start then get in touch with our projects team using the details below or follow the link here to complete our quotation form.

 

Call: +44 (0) 161 868 6000 | Email: projects@tuscorlloyds.com

Boxing Clever: Shipping Containers the Future of Housing?

Boxing Clever: Shipping Containers the Future of Housing?

In our industry the modest shipping container often gets overlooked as just a means to an end, an accessory to global trade. But more and more innovative projects have emerged in recent years, transforming the hostile steely boxes into beautiful welcoming homes.

Affordable housing is in short supply globally, with younger generations struggling to make their first steps on the property ladder. This is no truer than in the Danish capital, one of the most expensive cities in the world, where only the lucky few are able to own their homes. An apartment in the city centre will set you back around £4325 per square metre, that’s almost double the cost of property in Manchester.

Enter, Kim Loudrup company founder of ‘urban rigger,’ a fascinating new housing project for Copenhagen’s student residence, designed by architect Bjarke Ingels.

urban rigger shipping container homes
“The idea was to develop a revolutionary and innovative floating dwelling system that will have a positive impact on the housing situation for students in Europe, as well as completing an attractive untapped and geographically independent niche in the market, “the water ways”

The first fleet of the mobile, sustainable homes have been unveiled with Copenhagen’s harbour front the perfect location to present the first floating rigger concept. The images of the Urban Rigger development speak for themselves.

urban rigger shipping container homes

15 living spaces are positioned around a courtyard/ garden area, with communal roof terrace, bathing platform, barbecue area. Downstairs (below sea level) additional storage space is utilised with a technical room and laundry, all with environmentally friendly power solutions. As the units are essentially standardised shipping containers it also makes transporting the units viable by road and sea.

urban rigger shipping container homes
urban rigger shipping containers concept

Architect Bjarke Ingels explains, “the young people who enter into higher education today, are the same people that the world will rely on facing the unprecedented global challenges that lie ahead. Essential basic drivers of the student migration, such as the availability of centralized, sustainable and affordable student housing, is not only elemental, but cardinal in the quest to inspire and attract the best and the brightest to conquer the challenges of our exiting but fragile future.” – Bjarke Ingels

Our next location suggestion for Urban Rigger? Manchester’s Salford Quays and we’ll take 3… 

Image Source: Courtesy of urban rigger, laurent de carniere

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