Women in Maritime – What does it mean to be a woman in shipping?

Women in Maritime – What does it mean to be a woman in shipping?

What does it mean to be a woman in maritime?

 

The shipping industry has many faces. Depending on previous experiences, various pictures can come to you head when thinking of women in maritime.

Is she a tireless seafarer, fighting the elements on deck? Being perceived as a sensitive human being she proves we can be both delicate and strong. Maybe that’s being a human – regardless of gender.

Maybe she wears a suit instead of the overalls? In this male-dominated industry, she leads the meetings and negotiations to provide the most impossible solutions to her clients, spreading their product all around the world.

Or is she the one at the desk, always focused and quiet? Her dedication creates strategies that allow moving oversized cargo between the most remote destinations.

And maybe she is a captain of the ship or a CEO of the shipping company, and her empathy allows her to solve problems of the people before they become problems of the company.

Maybe she’s none of them.

Maybe she isn’t aware, these opportunities exist.

Or maybe she does, but the world convinced her it’s not the place for a girl.

 

Maybe she’s none of them.

We believe – she could be all of them.

We need all those strong personalities to step up and lead others by example, sharing own stories, battles and successes. 

- Marta Kuzma, Marketing & Communications

 

Along with all the maybes, come many dilemmas and questions.

We decided to address them with some of the great women working at Tuscor Lloyds!

What does it mean to be a woman working in shipping or logistics?

Being a woman in maritime is nothing else than being a woman the way you already know it. Logistics is in our nature! If you can coordinate your home, kids/plants/pets, work, exercise, love life and still find time for a coffee with friends or polishing your nails, you can do Shipping! – Suellen Higino

 As a woman, there is nothing better than attending a conference or a meeting where it is mainly male dominated and holding your own. We are seeing more of this now and I really hope this continues as we need more women in the industry. – Emma Fitton

When I started my career in this industry over 10 years ago, being a ‘woman in maritime’ was somehow unusual. Nowadays, there are more and more of us and we need to stop seeing this sort of career as something uncommon or challenging for women. This is the first step to make significant changes, changing the perspective. – Mirella Castle

Shipping industry is the place to find a career and not just a job.

- Emma Fitton, Business Development


How does being a woman impact your personality, help you in broadening your mind and self-growth?

For me, working in this industry for the past 15 years and seeing how far I have grown makes me very proud. After originally starting as just a job with no insight to shipping at all, I soon realised the potential and have used my knowledge and skills to grow from a Junior to Operations and on to Sales. There are great opportunities within the Industry, and although at times it includes long hours / long phone calls and long emails – it is always rewarding when you secure business and the customer is happy.Emma Fitton

This industry means a constant challenge. It demands extra efforts from us – women – to prove our skills and knowledge. All these ‘extra efforts’ made me grow professionally and kept me challenging myself in all areas of my life. Shipping demands quick reactions, having backup plans at all times and being able to anticipate possible problems. Improving those skills improved my personal life as well.  – Suellen Higino

Embrace your chance to stand out.

- Billie Cawley, Operations & Account Management

 

How do you think the industry could benefit from employing more women?

Diversity.  As the industry becomes more complex, it requires the employment of efficient staff, no matter the gender or age for that matter! – Billie Cawley

I believe that in the industry with such a strong presence of men, gaining more insights from women and learning their point of view would bring a more balanced and accurate perception of the market.
– Suellen Higino

I think the benefits are the same as employing men? What you can bring to the team – this is what matters.
– Mirella Castle

No day in shipping is the same and most days come with problems. Women have a very calm approach to solving them, us women assess the situation and calmly resolve. We get things done! – Emma Fitton

 

A rapid change in the market requires a new influence to grow and compete.

- Billie Cawley, Operations & Account Management

To support all the women in Maritime & Shipping

we all signed a pledge created by 

Women’s International Shipping & Trading Association:

We pledge to:

“Embrace diversity of thought (including gender, race, ethnicity, and age), and contribute to a merit-based business environment within my organisation. I will be a champion of equal opportunity and equal pay. My behaviour will reflect how I wish our industry to behave in the future. I will work – and encourage others to work – toward a diverse and inclusive maritime sector.”

We strongly encourage every person to sign the petition

and contribute to creating a better future of shipping!

Don’t be intimidated by your perception of the industry, because we are waiting for someone just like you!

- Mirella Castle, Operations & Account Management

Check out more news from our office below:

Let’s talk about a woman’s worth

Have a look to gain more insight into the situation of women in shipping and the benefits of inviting more of them to the maritime industry!

Our COVID-19 Statement – We Are Open For Business

Our COVID-19 Statement – We Are Open For Business

We would like to reassure our customers and suppliers that Tuscor Lloyds remains open for business as usual, despite current global events.  We are committed to going over and above to serve our clients, even during the most...

Growing together at Breakbulk Europe 2019

Growing together at Breakbulk Europe 2019

Breakbulk Europe Exhibition is something we look forward to every year. It’s a great opportunity for the logistics industry and breakbulk & projects cargo specialists to meet up and spend exciting time exchanging ideas, getting to know each other and strengthening...

Your shipping partner in Europe | INTERMODAL SOUTH AMERICA 2019

Your shipping partner in Europe | INTERMODAL SOUTH AMERICA 2019

Meet our Brazilian market expert Suellen Higino during Intermodal South America and learn about the benefits of having a trusted shipping partner in Europe!   This year Tuscor Lloyds celebrates 25 years of business, the same anniversary as The Intermodal...

Let’s talk about a woman’s worth

Let’s talk about a woman’s worth

You’re in your mid-twenties. It’s the first week of June when you walk out through the majestic door of your university. Birds are singing, the weather is warm and inviting, everything seems to be just the same as it was when you had entered the building this morning. But it’s not. Because after years of hard work you have reached your goal, you have graduated. And now, your career as a psychologist can start.

 

But it won’t. Because you’re a man. And you see, according to the law, only a woman can become a psychologist. It has to do with the fact, that psychologists deal with so many different people and situations, it requires them to be very empathic and understanding. Men are considered to have weaker emotional intelligence than women, so they shouldn’t work with people. Also, they are expected to be the head of the family, with their firmness and authority, so the government doesn’t want their strong personality to be affected by this type of career.

So here you are, miserable and helpless because someone made that decision for you. For the sake of the society, or worse, for your own good. How ridiculous does it sound?

I can bet, if you got through to this point, there wasn’t a moment you could fully relate to this story. And no one can blame you, because it sounds insane. Sounds impossible.

 

Yet, what if I told you it happened? Not in this country, not to this gender, in a different industry. In ours. In shipping.

 

Svetlana Medvedeva studied navigation in college and graduated as a navigation officer in the Russian Federation. After applying to work as a ship’s helmsman she was selected, however later her application was rejected due to the law. It took 5 years for the court to admit she was discriminated, yet even then, she couldn’t have been hired on her dreamed position. In Russia, there are 456 jobs in 38 industries from which woman are excluded due to Regulation No. 162, that lists the jobs too harmful or dangerous for women.

104 economies still have laws preventing women from working in specific jobs, 59 economies have no laws on sexual harassment in the workplace, and in 18 economies, husbands can legally prevent their wives from working. [1]

Globally, over 2.7 billion women are legally restricted from having the same choice of jobs as men. [1]

Research estimates that gender gaps cause an average income loss of 15% in OECD economies.

The International Transport Workers Federation (ITF) estimates that today, only 2% of global seafarers are women. [2]

All this data might sound scary at first sight, but there is some good news as well. In most cases, this absurd number of women in the shipping industry doesn’t come from any law restrictions or political issues. It is simply a result of common misconceptions, misunderstandings and bad habits. Those, however, might be more difficult to change, than the most restrictive law. Fortunately, they also happen to be dependent on individuals, which means each of us can contribute to the change. And by saying each of us, I mean both women and men.

First of all, let’s take the vocabulary used in the industry for this topic.

‘Make the industry more accessible’, ‘allow women to participate’, ‘give women access’, ‘allow women in’, ‘women could be missing out on careers’, ‘allow women to join’.

It makes me shudder. Those poor women, shall we let them work in our exclusive industry?

Fortunately, not all of us have such a miserable picture of this situation. In her exquisite article for Splash, KD Adamson says:

What if I told you that there was something you could do, which required no increase in capex or opex, and which could enable your company to outperform its competitors by up to 26% over the next six years. Interested? Good. Well, here it is. Put me on your board.

A better understanding of women’s role in the shipping industry should come along with this article. According to the Credit Suisse Institute’s research, companies with more female executives in decision-making positions continue to generate stronger market returns and superior profits. For this reason, at least, this men-dominated industry, instead of allowing women in, should consider inviting them in and truly hope for them to accept this invitation.

It’s a fact proven by research that having more women in your company, apart from being politically correct, is beneficial as well. In the end, everyone likes to benefit, especially when it’s expressed in ££.

On the other hand, it’s also women’s perspective that needs some updating. Growing up in the social environment that gives you quite a cut-and-dried vision of your future, it’s not that easy to see all the opportunities and possibilities in front of you. The shipping industry might have started realising it needs women on board, but are they aware? That’s why we need all those strong personalities to step up and lead others by example, sharing own stories, battles and successes. Organisations like Women’s International Shipping & Trading Association are the ones worth keeping an eye on.

 

In the end, it’s all about cooperation. It’s about finding the best possible way, to combine the skills of the best people, no matter what gender, and create the best possible future, for the shipping industry, for trade, for the world in general. And while searching for those talents, overlooking half of the population might not be the best solution. Trust us – we’ve been doing logistics for years.

 

 

[1] World Bank Group. 2018. Women, Business and the Law 2018. Washington, DC: World Bank. License: Creative Commons Attribution CC BY 3.0 IGO
[2] According to the International Transport Workers’ Federation

 

Also published by: Splash 247 . Read here.

 

Subscribe to our news!

In our monthly newsletters, we will share with you the industry news, case studies, and our own insights.

Finance for Forwarders?

Finance for Forwarders?

The UK’s export credit agency, UK Export Finance (UKEF) has pledged support to exporters and supply chain SMEs (small and medium sized enterprises) by accessing finance through their banks.
This scheme is set to provide thousands of businesses access to government backed finance. UKEF will provide working capital loans and bonds to SME customers and direct trade finance for suppliers who support exporters.
UKEF are working in partnership with five major high street banks (Barclays HSBC, Lloyds Banking Group, RBS/NatWest and Santander) to give companies access to the finance through their bank.
The Secretary of State for International Trade, Liam Fox commented:
“As an international economic department, this new partnership shows the Department for International Trade’s commitment to help small businesses seize the global demand for British exports. Providing easily accessible finance, backed by UKEF’s guarantee, will lift a common barrier to exporting. Providing finance to suppliers as well as exporters means spreading the benefits of global trade, supporting more jobs and growth for companies large and small.”
A new digital platform is being launched in conjunction with the scheme to ensure the quickest transactions.
The Head of Barclays Corporate Banking, John Mahon added:
“Delegated authority will make accessing UKEF guarantees simpler for many businesses and will help companies we work with grow more quickly. Both exporters and companies involved in international trade through supply chains will benefit, and we look forward to further collaborating with UKEF and our colleagues across the industry to find more new and innovative ways to help UK businesses take full advantage of export opportunities.”
UKEF has recognised the importance of supply chain SMEs and obviously wishes to strengthen its base. This becomes imperative as the UK heads into the political abyss once it leaves the European Union. But simply throwing money around is a cop out.
Indirectly investing through company banks is evidence of tunnel vision. UKEF can’t see the broader threats to industry and how a deregulated system can fail the public. The government must provide support with direct action and take responsibility for the export industry.
Providing support to major UK ports should be on the agenda. Ports are the gateway to the world and act as the foundations of international trade. But British ports are owned and ran by private companies. These companies often suffer from financial constraints meaning investment varies from port to port. Therefore establishing a registered body for ports will allow the government to personally ensure that British exports are handled well. UKEF could also promote new electric automated technology for increased efficiency in ports to benefit and stabilise export growth.
Additionally, the recent Petya cyber-attack highlights that stronger cyber-security is needed to sustain supply chains. Maersk is yet to return to full steam and suffered losses due to the attack. We can see the threat to a merchant fleet has evolved into a cyber-presence. The days of the Royal Navy protecting exports with gunboats are long gone. We must strengthen cyber-security and I would call on the government and UKEF to invest in cyber-defence development, especially with the scheme’s new digital format.
If the government wants stability in the future then it must solve the problems of today. It must guarantee the money invested will strengthen the supply chain for security in a post-Brexit society. The government has to develop a closer relationship with industry and not indirectly invest via banks.
Our COVID-19 Statement – We Are Open For Business

Our COVID-19 Statement – We Are Open For Business

We would like to reassure our customers and suppliers that Tuscor Lloyds remains open for business as usual, despite current global events.  We are committed to going over and above to serve our clients, even during the most...

‘Tis The Season For Sharing

‘Tis The Season For Sharing

As the song goes, Christmas is "the most wonderful time of the year".  However, this is not the case for everyone.  This year, our Christmas campaign is centered around mental health, to highlight this important issue.   Mental health charity Mind found the...

Growing together at Breakbulk Europe 2019

Growing together at Breakbulk Europe 2019

Breakbulk Europe Exhibition is something we look forward to every year. It’s a great opportunity for the logistics industry and breakbulk & projects cargo specialists to meet up and spend exciting time exchanging ideas, getting to know each other and strengthening...

Subscribe to Our Updates

Sign up to Tuscor Lloyds monthly newsletter and be the first to hear about news and offers as they are released and gain access to our latest project case studies!

Zero Emissions: Are we any closer?

Zero Emissions: Are we any closer?

The logistics industry must achieve zero emissions. If we continue to burn the 4 billion tonnes of crude oil we go through every year, then all known oil deposits will be gone by 2050. But the question of what shape the industry takes after fossil fuels still lingers despite the answer being in everyone’s best interest.
Carbon emissions are destructive to the Earth, and the supply chain is partly accountable for releasing them. The global logistics industry contributes a combined 4% of the world’s carbon emissions a year, yet was not formally cited in the Paris Agreement (PA) on climate change. Instead, the PA tasked the ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organisation) and the IMO (International Maritime Organisation) to regulate in accordance with the 2°C by 2020 target.

So, what are the ICAO and IMO doing?

The ICAO proposes levies, emissions trading and offsetting with CORSIA (Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme). Airlines can implement the scheme according to their business’s needs. Over 80% of the international aviation community already intend to participate in CORSIA, which comes into action in 2020.
Whilst the IMO proposed an initial roadmap which runs from 2018 to 2023, after which a revised strategy is implemented. The plan includes mandatory data collection of fuel oil consumption, a global sulphur cap by 2020 and further GHG (Greenhouse Gases) studies.
Although these steps should be welcomed, carbon-emitting fuels are still being burnt. Alternative energy solutions must be found for the sake of environmental protection and international trade. Long-term alternatives must come to the forefront of the ICAO’s and IMO’s mind, not the short term observations they propose. Consequently, the private sector has become the driver for enduring green innovation.
The answer seems simple in some areas; electrification. We have hybrid and fully electric cars and trucks on our roads on a commercial scale and such technology can move into container handling equipment.
This is becoming the case with Hyster’s recent announcement of an electric container truck, capable of carrying 48-tonne loads. Though only in early stages of development, it’s a step in the right direction.
Ports have to lower their GHG emissions and swapping diesel vehicles is the place to start and despite Trump’s decision to exit the PA, some American ports continue to pursue zero emission promises. Los Angeles and Long Beach ports have aimed for this by 2035. The renovations include a fully automated electric gantry and new adjacent rail line to eliminate thousands of truck journeys thus eliminating emission.
Air freight is also becoming greener. The JKIA (Jomo Kenyatta International Airport) cargo facility recently began using renewable energy to power their cold stores, cutting the terminal’s energy bill by 33%. There is also space for swapping diesel engine vehicles for electric power in air terminals.

But the biggest long-term goal has to be zero emissions from vessels and aircraft

For maritime travel, this end may be close. MOL’s fleet includes Emerald Ace, a hybrid car carrier using solar panels and lithium-ion batteries, the only operational ship of this kind. When in berth the ship uses its stored solar energy to power the electricity on board as opposed to a diesel generator. This is an exciting development albeit a small one as the vessel still uses its diesel engine in transit.

 

Although, expect a fully electric container cargo ship by late 2018. The chemical company YARA plans to launch YARA Birkeland, the zero emission vessel which will haul between their Norwegian production plant and the cities of Brevik and Larvik. This will replace 40000 truck journeys needed every year for the company’s haulage. Birkeland’s service will only be small voyages, exclusive to YARA but will act as a rehearsal for further electric nautical development. The industry shall eagerly observe the vessel and if it proves successful, we shall certainly witness a movement towards electrification.

Greener aviation is not as developed as the maritime sector but there is movement from passenger aircraft companies. EasyJet unveiled a hydrogen aircraft concept in early 2016. It uses the energy from the aircraft’s breaks and stores it in hydrogen cells. The cells will power the aircraft’s taxi to the runway and the electronics when grounded, estimating to save EasyJet up to £27 million in fuel. No information has emerged regarding tests since the concept was revealed.

On the other hand, the Dutch airline KLM has made a significant development as they started operating biofuel flights out of Los Angeles and Oslo in 2016. The biofuel is produced from plant oils and agricultural waste and has a 70% reduction of CO2 emissions compared to kerosene.
This may suggest biofuels are the best alternative for aviation because they are already operating and proving successful, but these flights are not completely running off biofuels. They use a ‘drop-in’ technique; a mixture of 50% biofuel and 50% conventional kerosene fuel, so the aircraft does not need to undertake modifications to accept the biofuel.
Drop in‘ fuel used on KLM biofuel flights:

%

Biofuel

%

Kerosene

These are important steps towards sustainability but as a whole, the industry has fallen behind. It is imperative to reduce carbon emissions yet we continue to burn away. But developing alternatives is a serious cost. Currently, biofuel is 3 times the price of kerosene and it was recently revealed that the Long Beach renovations will cost £1 billion. But it’s the private sector who are the driving forces behind better efficiencies and current financial pressures on logistics providers make research and development nearly impossible.
The ICAO and the IMO look to reduce emissions but fear investment. It has fallen on the brave few companies to invest heavy sums into new technology. But these high prices will fall once the supply chain realises its responsibility. Ports, liners, fuel companies and vehicle manufacturers, both sea and air alike, must make zero emission commitments to stimulate a competitive market and achieve long-term sustainability goals.
But we must also see the ICAO and IMO take up some of the slack. We, therefore, welcome the inauguration of the GIA (Global Industry Alliance). The 13 company alliance who will work with the IMO to develop and implement zero emission solutions right across the maritime industry.
We also advocate the CBP (Corporate Biofuel Programme) initiated by KLM to sustain and develop their biofuel operations. Once again it has been the private sector investment as the major contributors to this programme and a public/private bridge must be constructed with this programme, or similar synergies, to develop better efficiencies in aviation.
Port Focus: Mexican Ports

Port Focus: Mexican Ports

Last year we could observe a major increase if it comes to the cargo volumes handled by the Mexican ports.

Finance for Forwarders?

Finance for Forwarders?

UK Export Finance has pledged support to exporters and supply chain SMEs by accessing finance through their banks.

Subscribe to Our Updates

Sign up to Tuscor Lloyds monthly newsletter and be the first to hear about news and offers as they are released and gain access to our latest project case studies!

The Industrial History of Trafford Park

The Industrial History of Trafford Park

During our daily commute, many of us pass the former railway tracks that connected Trafford Park and the old docks of the Manchester Ship Canal. We quickly pass this relic, oblivious to the historic line. Once the centrepiece of Manchester’s industrial history, these tracks carried a total 2.5 million tonnes a year, now it’s an artefact of a past that we can often forget.
This history starts with the construction of the Manchester Ship Canal. Opened in 1894, it connects the Mersey Estuary to the Salford Quays. The Port of Manchester became the third largest port in Britain and this encouraged the development of Trafford Park, the world’s first planned industrial park. This attracted an influx of heavy industry through the 1890s. Large factories like the Trafford Brick Company, the Manchester Patent Fuel Company and W T Glover, a cable manufacturer who supplied all of Trafford Park with electricity, arrived in the early stages of the park’s development.
Through the rest of the 19th Century and into the early 20th century, more companies began to move to Trafford Park including the Ford Motor Company. Ford arrived in 1913 creating components for the Model T and other vehicles. However, they were to relocate to Dagenham, Essex in 1931.
Nevertheless, Ford returned to Trafford Park at the outbreak of World War II, under licence to manufacture Rolls Royce Merlin Engines used in the Spitfire, Hurricane and Lancaster planes. A total 34000 engines were constructed during the war effort and Trafford’s significance in the home front brought the looming threat of the Blitz. Many factories suffering structural damage due to the bombing raids.
Despite such damages, and Ford’s return to Dagenham, heavy industry continued to grow with an estimated 75000 working in Trafford Park once war ceased.
Sadly, this prosperity couldn’t be sustained. Employment in the park began to decline through the 1970s. The canal struggled with the recently launched wider container vessels and the docks closed. Materials for factories simply couldn’t arrive.
Employment fell to 15,000 in 1976. Much to the concern of the Trafford Park Industrial Council (TRAFIC), a group of companies based in Trafford established five years beforehand to combat the park’s decline. TRAFIC’s initiative efforts were futile. The fall of the park was inevitable. By the closing years of the 1980s, heavy industry in the area had vanished.
By 1987, the Trafford Park Development Corporation was established in order to attract private sector business to the park. Over the course of 12 years, a total £1.759 billion was invested generating 28,299 jobs by 1998. That same year saw the cease of operations on the railway between the docks and the park, marking the real end of an era. Heavy industry out, private sector in.
Nowadays a total of about 35,000 people work in Trafford Park. An Amazon distribution centre, logistics companies such as ourselves and the online financial advisors, Think Money reside here. The latter’s ‘Think Park’ is a five-building complex that includes on-site restaurant and gym. Think Money provide their entire operations out of these buildings and the absence of local branches is replaced with the internet. This modern industry is utterly juxtaposing to their neighbours Kellogg’s, whose cereal production is the only echo of Trafford Park’s manufacturing tradition, having been residents since 1938. Now Kellogg’s seem an intruder in Trafford Park, as the majority of business in the park is now office based.
The dramatic development of Trafford Park is remarkable. From the early industries to the efforts on the home front, to later decline and rebirth, all is worth remembering.
And for the future? With Peel Ports’ 2017 announcement of a £138 million regeneration of Salford’s Port, we may see a restoration of the Ship Canal’s former glory.

I doubt we’ll see any new trains on those old tracks anytime soon.

Port Focus: Mexican Ports

Port Focus: Mexican Ports

Last year we could observe a major increase if it comes to the cargo volumes handled by the Mexican ports.

Subscribe to Our Updates

Sign up to Tuscor Lloyds monthly newsletter and be the first to hear about news and offers as they are released and gain access to our latest project case studies!

Why The Latin American Market Is Considered To Be The Most Profitable

Why The Latin American Market Is Considered To Be The Most Profitable

Latin America is a very popular market for Spanish companies and is considered the most profitable by 69% of Spanish companies

According to the results of the second survey of exporters by Regus, Latin America is the chosen destination for 69% of Spanish companies offering products outside their home country. The survey, carried out by more than 20,000 top-level managers in more than 90 countries worldwide, also highlights that 50% of exporting companies have increased their profits in the past 12 months in comparison to the companies which trade exclusively on the national market.

The top 5 markets for export opportunities in Latin America

Colombia:

One of the main mineral exporters in the world. Colombia is set to become one of the major importing/exporting countries in Latin-America. In order to encourage the construction sector as well as other industry sectors, the Colombian government is offering tax benefits and development plans to companies which set up in the country.

Brazil

Various Spanish companies have found great opportunities in the Brazilian market. Brazil is a large market with over 200 million inhabitants and a middle class comprising of more than 55% of the population. To speak of Brazil as an emerging country in 2013 would be entirely erroneous. Today Brazil has solid foundations and high growth levels.

Panama

Has an excellent geographical position, political and economic stability, and tax advantages for companies established in the county. Panama holds the largest free zone in America (The Panama Canal) which undoubtedly will grow in importance in the coming years. So much so, that the government of Panama is strongly investing in improving all transport systems operating in the country.

Peru

Has an ever-growing industrial sector and a huge amount of untapped resources. One of the biggest handicaps of Peru is the massive concentration of economic activity in Lima. No less important is the protectionist government that leads the country. But none of these issues overshadows the reality, Peru is the market with many possibilities in Latin America.

Chile

Undoubtedly, Chile is the strongest Latin-American market in all respects. The political/economic stability is reflected in Chile’s international relations, resulting in a very positive impact in the price of the tariffs.

For more news and insights from Tuscor Lloyds, click here